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Energy Transition as seen from Nunavik

The Northern Energy Transition as seen from Nunavik: Towards an Integration of Inuit and their Interests in the Energy Production Process is a Master Thesis by Antoine Paquet

supervised by Geneviève Cloutier and Myriam Blais (Université Laval).


For a quick overview of the research framework, take a look a this thematic vignette (french) When Energy Shapes Villages: Evolution, Operation and Future of the Energy System in Nunavik for Réseau Villes Régions Monde.


Towards renewable alternatives, several initiatives aim to transform the current system of local energy production based entirely on fossil fuels. But in this global energy restructuring, what place and what roles will Nunavimmiut play? What Inuit interests are carried by the arrival of 'green energy' in northern villages?


This thesis focuses on these questions by proposing a qualitative approach centred on informal discussions with Inuit residents of Nunavik, semi-directed interviews with stakeholders of the northern energy transition and a literature review.


Inuit interests and preferences are viewed from historical, social and governance perspectives, and are anchored in equity and sustainable development perspectives.


The study suggests an understanding of the need for transition among Inuit. However, a dissonance appears to exist between Inuit and non-Inuit interests. Inuit concerns are linked to the socio-environmental specificities of their community as well as to the specific characteristics of each renewable technology.


The consideration of the Inuit governance system and cultural way of life by the promoters of the energy transition also represents a key factor in the approval of these changes by the Nunavimmiut.



Paquet, Antoine (2022) La transition énergétique nordique vue du Nunavik : vers une intégration des Inuit et de leurs intérêts dans le processus de production énergétique. Maîtrise en aménagement du territoire et développement régional - avec mémoire, Université Laval, 131 p.

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